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20121211
20121211
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
monti's back and forth on resignation casts uncertainty over italy's economic and political future. >> we begin the show with what has been a day of celebration for the european union. >> the three senior figures representing the eu have been in the norwegian capital, oslo, to collect the nobel peace prize. it was awarded to the 27-member bloc for six decades of promoting peace, democracy, and human rights. >> however, not everyone is happy. some have asked whether the price is justified at that time when the eu is mired in economic and financial -- the prize is justified at that time when the eu is mired in economic and financial crisis. desmond tutu says it is an organization based on military force. >> coveted award was accepted with pride by the eu's 3 president, martin schulz, herman van rompuy, and jose manuel barroso. the standing ovation they received was a rare accolade for the eu in these tough economic times. >> in light of the financial crisis that is affecting so many innocent people, we can see that the political framework in which the union is rooted is more importan
moment in italy. berlusconi has announced he's creating a new center right grouping. meanwhile, mario monti has been accused oversimplifying solutions during the fiscal crisis. carolin is joining us now from rome. do we expect more of this rhetoric today? >> oh, definitely. not just today, but specifically over two months. elections will only be held probably on february 24th. we've got about two months of the silly campaigning season to follow. so yes, as you said, the verbal exchange is definitely heating up. it started with mr. monti's response criticism coming from officials about his renewed request for the prime minister post yesterday. he said this criticism was out of place. it was offensive not just for him, but also for all of the people in italy who have the freedom to vote. this morning, he did an interview with one of the channels here in italy and he said, i don't really care about this spread because the spread is based on fraud. that's the direct translation. meanwhile, if you take a look at the spread, they are moving higher again. 4.9%. italian equity markets are mov
just that. share prices in italy have fallen sharply as investors reacted to in the news that mario monti intends to resign. berlusconi hopes to stage a comeback. >> stormy political weather ahead for italy. suddenly, mario monti is on the way out. there will be early elections and berlusconi is reaching for power again. on the markets, there is deep unease. they're like the austerity measures and the reforms of the technocrats, mr. monti. they fear the return of politics as usual in italy. even if berlusconi is far behind in the polls, the very idea his attempt at come back has jangled nerves. >> the markets are shocked at the prospect that berlusconi would become prime minister again. he is responsible for the crisis in italy. he should enjoy his pension. the reforms have to go on. >> in this from the marketplace, there is not much enthusiasm for a return of mr. berlusconi. >> we italians need to worry, not because of the current crisis. more because this idiot berlusconi is around. i hope it's a good smashed in the face. -- i hope he gets a good smash in the face. >> but berlusco
of europe's economic troubles. those same critics are pointing at italy. what does this say about investors? >> it says that investors are selling bonds. that's why the yields are going up. it also implies these same people are getting cautious, incrsing cautious er the country. he says he will resign once the next budget bill is passed. the rates had been easing for about a month. the key index on the milan stock exchange plunged by nearly 4% ending the day with a 2.2% drop. the euro was traded lower against the dollar and the yen. the future of italian politics is now more cloudy. the announcement doesn't seem to have caused nu ed much trouble investers outside of italy. >>> over in the united states president obama said he is ready to compromise before plunging over the fiscal cliff. >> people have a lot of views. i'm willing to compromise a bit. we asked the wealthy to pay a higher tax rate and that's a principle i won't compromise on. >> he said he could make some concessions so he can take tax cuts for the middle class. some republican lawmakers may agree to higher tax rates for the w
passage of the 2013 budget. the move raises political concerns over italy in the midst of the eurozone crisis. monti has been credited with keeping italy's debt crisis under control. the japanese economy has some gross domestic problems. japan's gdp has contracted two quarters in a row, signaling it has entered recession. a recent territorial dispute with the chinese government and struggles following last year's tsunami continue to hurt japan's export market. an election next week in japan could have a large effect on fiscal policy. reports say delta is close to landing a deal that will give the airline a 49% stake in virgin atlantic. bloomberg reports talks between delta and singapore airlines, which is looking to sell its stake in virgin, are advancing. the deal is estimated to cost between $300 and $500 million. it could mean a step up for delta's business, due to virgin atlantic's high volume of premium passengers. apple and google reportedly are forming a rather odd alliance. the two rivals are making a joint bid for a bundle of kodak patents. according to bloomberg news, the com
seeing signs of stress again with the concerns about leadership in italy, and problems in greece, and should we pay attention to that than the fiscal cliff discussions? >> well, you know, right now, doesn't seem like the market is paying attention to that right now. it reminds me a lot of september, before the election, when the s&p's rallied. everything was con taped. we were worried about central bank, liquidity, numbers okayed here, heating up in china. people thought europe was contained, and it feels that way now. people looking past the headlines whether it's the fiscal cliff or europe. i mean, there's a lot of doom day sayers out there, and it makes sense, but it seems like everything right now is contained, and the trade is up to the upside. david: right. liz mentioned the fed decision coming up, should be hearing about it tomorrow. what's the market expecting from the fed? in what way will they be excited or disappointed? >> well, i think the market, if you look at the options market, the flows into the ten year treasuries, it's implying 85 billion per month. the reason
trips to study abroad in spain, italy, morocco. perhaps most importantly chris knew how to relax and enjoy the moment. when i would periodically freak out about my course work or some o ther problem i thought i had he would make me stop and take a break, play a game of back gammon on the balcony and enjoy the view. it was an early lesson in the zenlike mindfulness of chris. no wonder he exceled in such a challenging and stressful career. i don't want you to think chris was perfect. after extensive research we came up with at least one or two blemishes on his record, sort of. in the interest of time i'm leaving out inappropriate limericks about philosophers. the only time i saw him lose his temper is when we were sharing a double room in the last year. some of the lessen lightened brethren decided to make a bunch of noise during finals week. when yelling at these guys didn't do the trick, chris burst out of bed, ran out onto the balcony, grabbed a water fire extinguisher and let them have it. he seemed much less angry when he came into the room and particularly pleased when the gu
at greece, but also they're watching the problems in italy. the news that mariom onti -- monti will step down. that's really dragging down the mood. >> let's look at some market numbers. dax closing up. stoxx 50 at 2624. the dow jones is currently up almost 1%. the euro is trading at $1.3007. >> agrees has reached their target in a bond buyback scheme, at least they are calling to the state tv. >> they bought the bonds at a discount of 70% from investors and the private banks. this was a condition for them to receive further eu funds. finance ministers are set to meet to discuss releasing the bailout funds. british banking giant hsbc has agreed to pay a record $1.9 billion to settle a money- laundering case. investigated by authorities in the united states. >> hsbc was accused of using the u.s. financial system to transfer funds from mexican drug cartels and from countries like iran that had been placed under international sanctions. >> the u.s. government says hsbc invaded these practices. they've have been said to enabled terrorists and others to ensure bent sanctions. despite the heft
? not italy, i can tell you that. one global investor shares his pick next. tracy: the food and the love is still better there. a look at the winners and losers on the nasdaq. as we head out to break, research in motion up top. liberty media holders and sears all down today. we will be right back. tracy: so here's a shocker, not only as a federal government spending way more money than it has, but state government spending is also out of control. so much so that had to hold a conference to figure that out. senior washington correspondent peter barnes has the latest. let's get all these people together, spend more money to figure out where overspending. >> it was an interesting conference. many state governments have also made big spending commitments they may not be able to keep and display experts at the u.s. chamber of commerce said it could be getting worse. this report from that task for force, the state budget crisis task force estimated state and local tension funds are underfunded by 8 trillion to 3 trillion. another trillion for unfunded health benefits and other health care refo
's happening with italian politics. of course, mario monti saying he was going to resign as italy's prime minister. that paves the way for flesh elections to be called in the beginning of next year. yesterday, we saw the negative reaction. sylvia berlusconi wants to make his return on the political scene. today, we saw a bounce back. if you can see see bind me, the bank stocks in italy rerebound, but it's only in the range of .5% to 1% of these names which were down in some cases nearly 10% yesterday. if you take a quick look at european bourses, if that's possible, down near the ftse mib, this is the one selling off somewhere in the range of 3.5% yesterday. today it's adding about .8%. in spain, showing a nice rebound. same attitude listing peripheral debt. we can take a look there. italy and spain seeing prices rise, yields falling to 4.75% and 5.75% respectively. is investor attention returning to spain? here is the thing. italy is the third biggest government debt market in the world. it's the third biggest economy in the eurozone. whatever happens with its political situation could p
. >> the european markets are closing now. >> remember yesterday and all that concern we had about where italy might go with the resignation of mario monti. greece is higher. por sh gal is higher. spain is higher. it's a good day for -- investor sentiment.strongly it was revealed today. optimism over what the fed is going to do in the united states tomorrow. optimism there will be a deal on the fiscal cliff. you have optimism that the recapitalization of the banks is going to be delayed by another year according to the bank of italy. and you have optimism as well on mar of election promises as we now face the pros wekt of a much earlier election in italy. to that end it is fascinating. sylvia berlusconi has come out today warning about the germano center of politics. in other words, too much of a focus on what is happening from germany and the austerity inspired by angela merkel. in particular, he is drawing attention to this. which is the spread of the extra that investors demand to hold italian bonds over german bonds. i've shown this to you a couple times. over the last year it's been a mainstay
a lover or simply to confound humanity. ben wedeman, cnn, florence, italy. >> i'm ted rowlands, thanks for joining us today. "cnn newsroom" continues right now with ashleigh banfield. >>> thank you so much, ted. hi, everybody. it's nice to have you with us. 11:00 on the east coast, 8:00 a.m. on the west coast. let's begin here, a threat to the strength of the union. it's playing out moment by moment in michigan today. one of the most heavily unionized states in america. that state is on the verge of passing something called a right to work law that would make it illegal to force anyone to join a union or pay union dues if they want to take the job. you've got live pictures here in front of you from the state capitol in michigan. that's lansing. thousands of protesters, none too happy with those challenging this law. more than 600,000 michigan workers are part of a union. they belong. and if you do the math with the population, that works out to nearly 18% of the state's workforce. much higher than the national percentage as well. our alison kosik has been story all morning long and the
to the private sector which is, i think, something we should look at. and, actually, italy has moved forward in the an expedited fashion open to private contractor ferrari which is now providing -- it's not planned -- they're now providing competing service to the public sector in italy. so we can look at some things that may be successful in other countries and try to pick the very best options. but have you on the record today supporting both the financing of the construction -- >> totally. >> i'm pleased to hear that. let me yield now if i may to ms. richardson. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i can only take my colleague, mr. denham, at his word. when we went to the central valley and he echoed the same today that one of the road blocks that's been for him has been the lack of kind of knowing the details as a colleague. and so the conversation you just went through with from lahood, how soon could we expect to get an update on who those private company -- who these private companies are that are able to invest, how much are they willing to invest, and how soon is this going to come together?
, italy. >>> i'm suzanne malveaux. a huge pro-labor rally outside the michigan state house. look. demonstrators protesting so-called right-to-work legislation that lawmakers are in the process of voting on. the house has already voted to approve the part of the law covering public employees. alison kosik outside the michigan state house in lansing. give us a sense of why this is so important to folks there. a huge demonstration. people who are angry on both sides. >> reporter: oh, yeah. unions are really at the fabric of so many people who live in michigan. it's why these protesters have come out today though the numbers, they got probably as high as a few thousand. the numbers have dwindled ever since that first vote came through. this means so much to the folks who live here in michigan because unions were practically born here. the united autoworkers union born here in 1935. 17 357b9% of the people who work in the state belong to unions. it's one of the top of the highest rates in the country. so to see the union undercut by the right-to-work legislation, that is being discuss
as you have a drag on the economy. you have negative growth, a recession in spain and italy this year. you also have negative growth in greece. there's only so much you can have of negative growth across the continent of europe before impact spending patterns across the world. there are positives out there but we have to be focused on the fact that these problems are not going to go away. one of every four people in spain are unemployed and under the age of 25. fifty-six% to not have a job. that is a major rest of the for disaster and the math does not work. if you try to fix a problem with negative growth and nobody working. dennis: a lesson here. one last note on the fed. what is your concern there? >> pretty simple. the fed has raised the credit market. yield and price are not real. they are buying up trillions of dollars of these bonds and i'm worried about the day when the market no longer listens to them. the market has not been bigger than the fed over the last few years. of the market gets bigger than the fed, look out. yields should be much higher than where they are and if w
loans were exactly the same at 4% a year in the u.k., spain, and italy. today the four rates are very different. ours has fallen markedly. rates have come in a great deal. i was -- that was the first pillar. the second is that policy would provide the vehicle for accommodating the stimulus to the economy. fiscal policy would be a head wind in terms of the movement of total demand. monetary policy would be accommodative and more importantly, would accommodate the sharp fall in the sterling exchange rate which had taken place between the end of 2007 and the beginning of 2009. that was a 25% fall in the average effective exchange rates of sterling against other currencies. the biggest since the second world war. and the monetary policy was to make sure that that gain in competitiveness was retained by ensuring that domestically generated inflation would remain stable. these pillars were thought to be consistent with the gradual recovery of the economy. what happened was we did not get a gradual recovery. we saw output being broadly flat over the past 2.5 years. it has been a zigzag patte
, as nat king cole sang, to tempt a lover or to confound humanity. ben wedeman, cnn, florence, italy. >> thank you. >>> they had a loaded handgun. they tried to carjack a woman. >> it is fully loaded and cooked and ready to blow your brains out these two suspects ran from the police. so why won't they face any jail time? we're on the case next. diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. i get congested. but now, with zyrtec-d®, i have the proven allergy relief of zyrtec®, plus a powerful decongestant. zyrtec-d® lets me breath freer, so i can love the air. [ male announcer ] zyrtec-d®. behind the pharmacy counter. no prescription needed. [ male announcer ] zyrtec-d®. behind the pharmacy counter. can your hearing aid do this? lyric can. lyric can. lyric can. lyric by phonak is the world's only 24/7, 100% invisible hearing device. it's tiny. but that might be the least revolutionary thing about lyric.
found humanity. ben wedeman, florence, italy. >> you will have to head to paris where it's hanging at the museum. >>> you're in the situation room. happening now, cooking up an explosive recipe for war. a bomb maker fighting the homemade grenades. plus, supreme court justice incites political controversy with comments that some consider rather anti-gay. >> and disturbing new allegations about the owner of the plane that crashed the superstar latina. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in the situation room. >> he was the elite of the elite. soaring to the top of the u.s. special forces unit known for taking out osama bin laden and achieving a near lifelong goal many could only dream of training for. now we're learning more about the u.s. navy s.e.a.l. who died in that successful mission to rescue an american held captive in afghanistan. brian todd is in that navy s.e.a.l.'s home town. what are you learning about him? >> reporter: people in this town of north huntington and adjoining town of irvin are reeling from this loss. they say the focus and determination that nicolas checque demonstrate
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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